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China Miéville


(China Tom Miéville)
UK (1972 - )

China Miéville has lived all his life in London. His first novel, King Rat, received superb reviews and was nominated for fantasy awards, and his second, Perdido Street Station, astonished the literary world with its imaginative power and sheer inventiveness.
 
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Anthologies containing stories by China Miéville
 
Short stories
An End to Hunger (2000)
Details (2002)


Awards
Bram Stoker Best First Novel nominee (2000) : King Rat
Arthur C. Clarke Award Best Book winner (2001) : Perdido Street Station
British Fantasy Society Best Novel winner (2001) : Perdido Street Station
World Fantasy Best Novel nominee (2001) : Perdido Street Station
Hugo Best Novel nominee (2002) : Perdido Street Station
Philip K Dick Award Best Book nominee (2002) : The Scar
Arthur C. Clarke Award Best Book nominee (2003) : The Scar
British Fantasy Society Best Novel winner (2003) : The Scar
Hugo Best Novel nominee (2003) : The Scar
Nebula Awards Best Novel nominee (2003) : Perdido Street Station
World Fantasy Best Novel nominee (2003) : The Scar
Arthur C. Clarke Award Best Book winner (2005) : Iron Council
Hugo Best Novel nominee (2005) : Iron Council
World Fantasy Best Novel nominee (2005) : Iron Council
British Science Fiction Association Best Book winner (2009) : The City & the City
Arthur C. Clarke Award Best Book winner (2010) : The City & the City
Hugo Best Novel winner (2010) : The City & the City
John W Campbell Memorial Award Best Novel nominee (2010) : The City & the City
Nebula Awards Best Novel nominee (2010) : The City & the City
World Fantasy Best Novel winner (2010) : The City & the City
Arthur C. Clarke Award Best Book nominee (2012) : Embassytown
Hugo Best Novel nominee (2012) : Embassytown
John W Campbell Memorial Award Best Novel nominee (2012) : Embassytown
Nebula Awards Best Novel nominee (2012) : Embassytown
Andre Norton Award Best Book nominee (2013) : Railsea
John W Campbell Memorial Award Best Novel nominee (2013) : Railsea


China Miéville recommends
Jane Eyre
Jane Eyre (1847)
Charlotte Brontë
"The greatest work of horror ever. OK, technically there are no monsters or aliens or what-have-you, but there's no way this isn't horror. A book about madness, loneliness, manipulation, class and sex that's more frightening than any tentacled thing Lovecraft could come up with."
The Island of Doctor Moreau
The Island of Doctor Moreau (1896)
H G Wells
"Short, cold, economic and totally unrelenting. An utterly terrifying book, Wells's outstanding achievement by far."
Strange Evil
Strange Evil (1957)
Jane Gaskell
"The book was written when Gaskell was 14, and though it suffers from all the flaws her youth would lead you to expect, it is a staggering achievement. A fraught fairyland full of sexuality, and containing the most extraordinary baddy in fiction."
The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch
The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch (1964)
Philip K Dick
"It's infuriating to have to choose just one of Dick's works - he is the outstanding figure in SF. In the end I went for Stigmata because I remember how I felt when I put it down. Hollow and beaten. I kept thinking: 'That's it. It's finished. Literature has been finished.'"
The Gormenghast Trilogy
The Gormenghast Trilogy (1967)
(Gormenghast)
Mervyn Peake
"Somehow this manages to be both rich and austere at the same time - the sense is of vastness, but of unbearable claustrophobia, too. The egregious BBC adaptation turned it into an Augustan costume romp and stripped out all the shadows and all the dust. Philistines."
The Dark Domain
The Dark Domain (1993)
Stefan Grabinski
"Early in the last century, this shockingly underrated Polish writer saw the horror that haunted modernity. His ghosts and demons don't inhabit graveyard or ruins, but steam trains, electricity cables, and the rapidly growing cities. The antithesis of nostalgic fantasy. "
Stranger Things Happen
Stranger Things Happen (2001)
Kelly Link
"This small-press short-story collection by a young American writer is a joy - a very tired word, and not one I use lightly. I've not been so moved and affected - and dammit, yes, inspired - by a book for a long time. "
Wanderers and Islanders
Wanderers and Islanders (2002)
(Legend of the Land, book 1)
Steve Cockayne
"Steve Cockayne has created something fascinating and strange. It resonates like a sudden memory - one that is intricate, important and moving."
Things That Never Happen
Things That Never Happen (2002)
M John Harrison
"That M. John Harrison is not a Nobel Laureate proves the bankruptcy of the literary establishment."
The Year of Our War
The Year of Our War (2004)
(Fourlands, book 1)
Steph Swainston
"Exuberant, incredibly inventive, a blistering debut, and honest-to-god unputdownable."
Shriek: An Afterword
Shriek: An Afterword (2006)
(Ambergris, book 2)
Jeff VanderMeer
"Unsettling, erudite, dark, shot through with unexpected humour. Ambergris is one of my favourite haunts in fiction. "
Deadstock
Deadstock (2007)
(Punktown, book 2)
Jeffrey Thomas
"Jeffrey Thomas has done something wonderful."



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